Veröffentlichte Artikel

AmericanLaboratory-XCiteXLED1Feature
“Light-Emitting Diodes: A New Solution for Fluorescence”, American Laboratory

From the dramatic increase in new fluorophores to the proliferation of techniques like total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF), photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM), and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), all the signs are clear: Live cell imaging is driving the next generation in biological imaging, and fluorescence is leading the parade...

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0712_MicroscopyToday
Fluorescence Microscopy Light Sources, Published by Cambridge University Press

July 2012 - Fluorescence microscopy techniques are now prevalent throughout the life sciences and many of the physical sciences. These techniques are often dependent on white light sources that have evolved from the more traditional mercury arc lamp to metal halide sources to the more recent light emitting diodes (LEDs)...

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0912_MicroscopyToday
A Microscopy Today Innovation Award is presented to Lumen Dynamics for the XLED1 Internal Pulse Generator

September 2013 - The Internal Pulse Generator (IPG) provides precise time control of individual LEDs within the X-Cite XLED1 Fluorescence Illuminator down to the microsecond timescale, allowing the pulsing of single LEDs at user-defined intervals from 10 µs to 18 hours...

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BioscienceTech_TopTrends
Top Trends in Life Science Research

One great challenge is achieving greater accuracy and throughput for in vivo imaging of small animals. Researchers want to study the same mice repeatedly over time to understand how cellular processes change. By conducting longitudinal studies researchers gain better statistical power, use fewer animals, and arrive at a conclusion quicker than with cross-sectional studies.

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JA11_Xcite-Reprint
Fluorescence Illumination: New Metrics for Reproducibility and Quantitation

August 2011 - For decades, there has been talk about a mechanism for measuring and calibrating true illumination intensity, not at the source or somewhere in the optical path, but specifically at the sample plane, taking into account all the interactions between light source, optics and filters...

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BST_FRET_Micro_Feb11
FRET Microscopy

By watching two proteins coming close together, biologists learn about protein interactions, as well as when they interact and where. To view these mechanisms, researchers often turn to FRET, or Forster (sometimes called fluorescence) resonance energy transfer...

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StableLightSource
BioOptics World features X-Cite®'s FRET Application Note

Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging provides an effective way to quantify the interactions of biological molecules, but the approach can be compromised by a number of errors. Stable illumination and precise control can go a long way to overcoming these errors...

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